Say you have a disability, and you cannot work. You apply for SSDI benefits, and you get them. Then you find a job that you can manage to do. At least, you think you can. You start working, as you’d prefer to work if possible.

After six months, though, you realize it’s just not possible. Your disability does prevent you from doing this job, even though you hoped that it would not. You decide that you need to stop working and get back on the SSDI benefits. Now you have to apply all over again, right?

That’s actually a common myth. For many, the original case can simply be reinstated. This is generally true if you stopped getting the SSDI benefits in the last five years. So, in this example, you are well within that requirement.

It is not the only requirement. If you have a new disability, you may have to apply again. If you have the same one — or a related one — then you can typically just start the process back up. In fact, during any time that it takes to get them going again, some workers can get temporary cash benefits.

In short, do not assume that you have to jump through all of the hoops all over again. As long as you know what steps to take, it can be much faster this time around.

Of course, the key is to understand those steps and the legal requirements. It can be helpful to work with an experienced legal team, especially if you are not sure of your rights or how to begin.